Mwebantu Reporter

November 14, 2017
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1min8540

Tomorrow is the awards ceremony for the 2017 Partners Guide Young Zambian Business Journalist of the Year Competition.

The panel of judges below have made their decisions and we are looking forward to hearing in front of a number of government officials including Her Honour the Vice President, captains of industry, diplomats including the Ambassador of Sweden to Zambia and former Partners Guide alumni at Taj Pamodzi tomorrow morning who the victors will be.

 

Judging panel:

Hon Dr. Effron Lungu – former Minister of Foreign Affairs
Prof Oliver Saasa – CEO, Premier Consult
Mulenga Kapwepwe – Chairperson, National Arts Council
Chana Musakanya-Capaldi – Managing Partner, Ogilvy
Samba Yonga – Media & Communications Consultant

Like, share and follow @Partners Guide Magazine to find out who will scoop the award!

November 2, 2017
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9min8861

The President of Zambia’s Small Scale Miners Association explains the efforts to help more Zambians benefit from the mining industry.

Can you explain SSMAZ’s role in the Zambian mining sector and highlight its priorities for the sector?

Education, training, demonstration and monitoring are the key elements of any program for artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) in Zambia and improving occupational safety and health in ASM. Fair-trade initiatives for giving small-scale producers in developing countries the opportunity to trade their products under better selling terms and conditions should be developed wherever possible. Encouragement and support for the formation of cooperatives, associations or enterprises to support communication, cooperation and coordination between miners should also be provided as opportunities for networking between miners to share information and coordinate activities are often productive.

From the small-scale miner’s perspective, what is the greatest challenge facing the Zambian mining sector?

Zambia is rich in minerals — gold, cobalt, copper and emeralds — but we have not fully managed to convert that wealth for the benefit of the people of Zambia. We need to know where to improve and what changes to make so we can harness this wealth to benefit not only current, but also future generations of Zambians. These positive aspects are overshadowed by a lack of transparency and accountability regarding revenue management, a lack of consistency surrounding fiscal policy, and lack of support for diversifying the economy and leveraging of infrastructure for the general population. Key stakeholders noted the need for the mining industry to more effectively use local products and services, but currently there is no national supplier development policy for the industry. Consequently, 95% of goods and services used by the mining industry are imported.

There are also concerns about social and environmental issues surrounding the mining sector. Zambia’s regulations in this area are a good starting point, but regulatory and monitoring agencies must be strengthened to conduct more meaningful consultation among stakeholders on issues affecting the sector. Worldwide there is the perception that mining companies invade local territories and leave gaping holes once they have extracted mineral resources. In this regard, we see the interaction of mining companies with the communities in which they are hosted as opportunities for sustainable partnership built on providing education and thus potential for quality employment, local business development as well as citizens ownership of the mining companies.

What are the opportunities for cooperation between small-scale miners and large-scale producers?

Large-Scale Mining (LSM) companies increasingly come across Artisanal and Small-scale Mining (ASM) workers during their exploration or production activities in the developing world. The ASM-LSM relationship is often conflictual because both types of miners compete for the same resource or because they perceive each other as a threat. Hence we have seen an increase in situations where LSM are now shorting ASM to protect the minerals. However, the ASM-LSM relationship is now also undergoing a largely positive evolution in some part due to new Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) commitments. In some places, “Mining Together” has become more than a dream. The Communities and Small-scale Mining (CASM) initiative wishes to contribute to the sharing of knowledge and solutions related to ASM-LSM issues. CASM has partnered with two key resources in the field of community development and mining: the World Bank / International Finance Corporation Oil, Gas and Mining Sustainable Community Development Fund, and the ASM working group of the International Council on Metals and Mining, though this program is yet to be introduced to Zambia. This guide is the result of this collaboration and provides an informative overview of the experiences of the most typical ASM-LSM issues and guidance for appropriate interventions.

In terms of value addition, what opportunities are there for Zambians to extract more from their resources and what needs to be done to promote the industry’s capacity to develop these initiatives?

In terms of value addition, the International Council on Mining and Metals estimates that procurement of imported goods is almost entirely made through Zambian companies, but only 5% of industry goods procured for the purpose of mining are locally manufactured. In an effort to promote business relationships with local suppliers, mines have created programs and employed imported staff to assist businesses in tendering, marketing, or developing technical capacities, among others. For example, Kanshansi offers a development program in which it trains emerging contractors, offers business development workshops for SMEs, and continually explores possibilities for local manufacturing, but this is reducing because labor is been imported from outside.

The government has also instituted some local content regulations according to the MMDA of 2015, whereby a mining company has to give preference to materials and products made in Zambia, as well as Zambian contractors, suppliers, and service agencies. While this is difficult to enforce, the mines adhere to this stipulation not only because it is the law, but also because it is cheaper and more convenient for them to deal with local companies if they are available. The legislation also specifies preferential employment to citizens and the implementation of training programs in technical and managerial skills for Zambians. In some cases, backward flow such as production of mill balls for the Kansanshi mine in Solwezi and other mines in the Copperbelt has not been supported by the mines through their local development programs. Several services and organizations from outside the government and the mines have also created local content programs to work with local businesses, including the Zambian Mining Local Content Initiative, or the Private Enterprise Programme, Zambia. While these initiatives have been successful, their effects are only slowly influencing local business development. Such initiatives by the mining sector and other agencies should be coordinated and integrated into broader national development plans to stimulate the local economy and support the growth of local businesses.

What final message would you send to international readers and local players about the future of the Zambian mining sector as a whole and the role of small-scale miners?

By investing in its population, the state will have more skilled professionals both to create local businesses as well as an easily accessible workforce for companies entering Zambia. Additionally, the government has to ensure that all policies and regulations are coordinated to support local content, SMEs, and public private partnerships. In terms of the tax regime, stability and predictability, more incentives, as well as more transparency are fundamental. Zambia remains a perfect case study for natural resource governance due to both its long tradition of mining and its experience in nationalization and privatization. It is, furthermore, a politically stable and peaceful state, despite the rampant poverty and vulnerability issues. Expected GDP growth is 3.9% in 2017 and 4.6% in 2018, and underpinning this growth is improved production in agriculture, energy and mineral production, although mining will still be a large part of our economy in years to come. The anticipated IMF bail-out is expected to have positives such as increased liquidity in the market, help reduce government borrowing in the market and crowding out private sector, and also add an additional layer of oversight from IMF on government to adhere to agreed fiscal discipline.

To learn more and get in touch with SSMAZ visit: http://www.smallscaleminerszambia.com

October 30, 2017
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2min17195

The 10 finalists of the @Partners Guide Magazine Young Zambian Business Journalist of the Year have been announced:

 

  • Angela Chilekwa
  • Barnabas Zulu
  • Fatima Mawele
  • Kelvin Mbewe
  • Luckson Sikananu
  • Mapalo Mulenga
  • Namwenda Mulongo
  • Nchimunya Muvwende
  • Racheal Mbewe
  • Wamweni Samundengu

 

The finalists will undergo a week’s training at the Embassy of Sweden in Lusaka to be administered by trainers from the UK, Kenya, South Africa and Zambia starting on Monday before competing to win a trip to Sweden where the winner will visit Swedish media houses and Swedish businesses with a presence in Zambia.

Highlights of the 2014 Awards Ceremony:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMC_fEqLIL4&t=452s

 

Event supported by @Embassy of Sweden in Lusaka, @Musika Zambia, @Standard Chartered, @Taj Pamodzi Hotel, @Good Time Steel and transportation Company Limited, @Atlas Copco, @Devere Zambia, @Roche and Guilffords Group, @Mwebantu, @HOT FM Zambia, @Zambia Daily Mail

October 27, 2017
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2min124610

On  29th of September 2017, the Minister of Finance, Hon. Felix Chipota Mutati MP, delivered the 2018 Budget Address to parliament and the Zambian Nation themed “Accelerating Fiscal Fitness for Sustained Inclusive Growth, Without Leaving Anyone Behind”.

The budget is focused on consolidating gains made in the past year of promoting fiscal fitness and anchoring the five strategic pillars outlined in the Seventh National Development Plan (2017-2021) namely; economic diversification and job creation, poverty and vulnerability reduction, reduction of developmental inequalities, enhancing human development and creating conducive governance environment for a diversified and inclusive economy.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW/DOWNLOAD THE 2018 NATIONAL BUDGET INFOGRAPHIC

The Policy Monitoring and Research Centre (PMRC) is a public policy think-tank that was established in 2012 to promote public understanding through research and education. Our role is to encourage and facilitate debate on social and economic policy issues critical to national development. As a resource hub, PMRC is a source of quality data relevant for stakeholders in areas of social and economic development.

To learn more: visit the link on the Policy Monitoring and Research Centre (PMRC) Zambia Website

October 26, 2017
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3min75234

Time to get moving with your entry for the Partners Guide Young Zambian Business Journalist of the Year Competition where the winner will get to travel to Sweden! If you’ve started, why not finish? If you haven’t started and you’re not busy, there’s still time.

2014 competition winner David Ngenda said, “it took me about 24 hours to complete my initial entry, and looking at how things worked out it was definitely worth submitting.”

If you have a passion for business, are you into economics, would love to participate in world class training, unlock career opportunities and stand the chance to travel to Sweden then you should participate.

To enter, report on a business or economic topic you feel is important to Zambia’s development. Entries are open to participants who are resident in Zambia with a valid NRC and Grade 12 certificate born on or after 30th October 1987, with the ability to communicate a business and economic topic either via written word, photography, infographics, cartoon illustrations, audio or video reporting as outlined below:

  • Print (800 words)
    • Broadcast (5 minute audio or video piece including quotes)
    • Photojournalism (1 photo plus 400 words explaining the story behind the photo)
    • Infographic journalism (a landscape piece that can be legible over two A4 pages)
    • Cartoon journalism (eight frames with captions)

Send your entries to info@pgzambia.com

LIKE AND FOLLOW THE @Partners Guide Magazine FACEBOOK PAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION!

DEADLINE IS FRIDAY 27TH OCTOBER AT 13:00

The competition is supported by the @Embassy of Sweden in Lusaka, @Musika Zambia, @Standard Chartered, @Taj Pamodzi Hotel, @Good Time Steel and transportation Company Limited, @Atlas Copco, @Devere Zambia, @Roche and Guilffords Group, @Mwebantu, @HOT FM Zambia, @Zambia Daily Mail

 

October 13, 2017
2015 OVERALL WINNER MUKUKA MULENGA
2015 WINNER - BROADCAST JOURNALISM CATEGRORY - DIANA NGWENYAMA
2015 WINNER - PHOTOJOURNALISM CATEGORY TAPSON SIBANDE
3min1675

The Partners Guide Young Zambian Business Journalist of the Year Competition is back.

Do you have a passion for business? Are you into economics? Are you aged between 18 and 29? Stand a chance to win an unforgettable prize and unlock career opportunities by participating in the 2017 Partners Guide Young Business Journalist of the Year competition.

To enter, report on a business or economic topic you feel is important to the development of Zambia.  Entries are open to participants who are resident in Zambia with a valid NRC and Grade 12 certificate born on or after 30th October 1987 with the ability to communicate a business and economic topic via written word, photography, info graphics, cartoon illustrations, audio or video reporting as outlined below:

  • Print (800 words)
  • Broadcast (5 minute audio or video piece including quotes)
  • Photojournalism (1 photo plus 400 words explaining the story behind the photo)
  • Infographic journalism (a landscape piece that can be legible over two A4 pages)
  • Cartoon journalism (eight frames with captions)

The Partners Guide will then select the Top 10 entries regardless of how they are dispersed between the above categories. The Top 10 finalists will then be invited to participate in a week’s training at the Embassy of Sweden in Lusaka conducted by highly regarded media practitioners from the UK, Kenya, Uganda, South Africa and Zambia, many of whom have received prestigious international awards or work for internationally renowned media companies.

Finalists’ submissions will be refined in collaboration with the mentors and will feature in appropriate selected media. A documentary produced about the Partners Guide Young Business Journalist of the Year will be aired in the media after the awards ceremony.

The winner is to travel abroad (destination to be confirmed) to visit respected media companies and will produce content about their experience to be aired on appropriate media platforms in Zambia.

Submit your entry with a copy of your CV and ID to info@pgzambia.com

Deadline for entries is Monday 23rd October at 09:00.

For more information about potential commercial opportunities connected to the competition, awards ceremony and media coverage before during and after the event, please contact +260 971 583 449.

The competition is supported by the Embassy of Sweden, Musika, Standard Chartered, Taj Pamodzi, Good Time Steel, Mwebantu, Hot FM and Daily Mail


About us

Mwebantu is a Zambian daily online newspaper founded in 2012 by Chilambe Katuta, a Thomson Reuters Foundation Alumni. Thomson Reuters Foundation is the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, the global news and information provider. The Mwebantu website was designed by Kasonde Mulenga a Web and Systems Developer from the University of Greenwich in London, England.


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